Forum Session

Promising Models of Care Coordination for Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions: Getting Closer to the Holy Grail?
April 3, 2009

Manager

Carol V. O'Shaughnessy, MA

Summary

Recent press reports about research on Medicare chronic care demonstrations suggest that few of the demonstration approaches have been successful. However, moving beyond the headlines and digging deeper and wider, it appears that some chronic care models—within and outside Medicare—have indeed been able to coordinate care and offer promise for future policy on chronic care improvement. The challenge for policymakers is to understand the characteristics of these models and what elements could be incorporated into future policy directions. This Forum session, the second of two, focused on a discussion of selected models that have improved patient outcomes while reducing or controlling costs.

The companion meeting on March 27, "Coordinating Care for Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions: Searching for the Holy Grail," looked at the prevalence and demographics associated with chronic care, its impact on delivery and financing patterns, and major federal research and demonstration efforts that have tested ways to better coordinate and manage patient care.

Speakers

Chad Boult, MD, Director, Roger C. Lipitz Center for Integrated Health Care, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University; Eric A. Coleman, MD, Professor of Medicine, Divisions of Health Care Policy and Research and Geriatric Medicine, University of Colorado and Health Sciences Center, and Director, Care Transitions Program; Mary Naylor, PhD, FAAN, Marian S. Ware Professor in Gerontology, University of Pennsylvania; Kenneth Coburn, MD, President and Chief Executive Officer, Health Quality Partners

Slides from the presentations by Dr. Boult (set 1 and set 2), Dr. Coleman, Dr. Naylor, and Dr. Coburn are available for download. Speakers' biographies are also available.

Related Materials

See also the entry for the companion meeting (March 27, 2009).

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